How To: Calculate compound interest using a TI-84 and solver

This is a video tutorial in the Electronics category where you are going to learn how to calculate compound interest using a TI-84 and solver. Press the apps button on the calculator and press enter to load the TVM Solver which is the 1st choice. Here the meaning of various notations are N is time, I% is the percentage, PV is present value, PMT is payment, FV is future value and C/Y is compounding period. The problem is find the compound amount and the interest earned on $12,903.45 compounded...

How To: Print 2-sided (duplex) w/ an Epson all-in-one printer

The Epson video describes how to print two-sided on one piece of paper. When document is ready, go to "File" and then "Print". Click the "Properties" button and select Page Layout tab and turn on the two-sided printing option. Click "OK" in print window. Wait for Epson printer to complete the first page. Take paper, flip over and put it back upside down in the paper feeder. There are instructions that will pop out on screen for this. Click resume and the second page will be printed on the bac...

How To: Transform Multiple Screens into One Big Virtual Display

The Junkyard Jumbotron is an amazing project that allows a collection of random web browser enabled displays—laptops, smartphones or tablets—to share a single image split across the group, creating one large virtual display. Created by Rick Borovoy at MIT's Center for Future Civic Media, the app is completely free and open, meaning you can do it yourself in a matter of minutes. It works like this:

How To: Use a multimeter to test common household appliances

If you're doing any sort of electrical work at home, a multimeter is an invaluable tool to have. But as invaluable as it is to have a volt/ohm meter, it is obviously even more invaluable still to know how to use one. And, with this electrician's how-to, you'll learn how to do just that. For more information, and to get started using and reading multimeters yourself, watch this free video guide.

How To: Begin circuit bending

Looking to get into the weird world of circuit bending? In this four part video tutorial geared towards beginners, learn in thirty minutes how to circuit bend. Tools you will need include a soddering iron with innerchangeable tips (thin pencil preferred), thin sodder, hook-up wire, a wire cutter, a wire stripper, a drill with drill bits, plyers (needle nose included), and screw drivers of various small sizes. Other useful tools include cresent wrenches for toggle switches, jewelers files, & a...

How To: Easily enter a destination on the Garmin Nuvi 750

Garmin is a popular and trusted brand of GPS devices. In this video, learn how to enter destinations and perform other basic tasks with a Garmin Nuvi 750. This video shows you the Nuvi 750 but all of the instructions should also work with other Garmin models. GPS is fantastic for traveling to new destinations, getting out of a lost situation and finding unknown places faster.

How To: Hack someone's web cam or online security camera

This tutorial will let you hack into a wide selection of web cams and online security cameras. The hack is actually quite easy, and is best done with a browser like Mozilla Firefox. Navigate to Google in your browser, and then type in "inurl:viewerframe?mode+refresh". This piece of code will open up a list of active webcams. Then just surf through your choices and watch whatever you want. You can even change the camera angle and zoom in and out of the picture!

How To: Graph Mario on a TI-83 Calculator

When it comes to graphing and comparing functions, the TI-83 graphing calculator is the end-all device for math and science students. But one of the most entertaining aspects of Texas Instruments' powerful algebraic and trigonometric calculator is not the equations themselves, but rather the art that can be "equated" on them—just think of them as the mathematical equivalent of the Etch A Sketch.

How To: Build a small DIY hydrogen fuel cell science experiment

The hydrogen fuel cell has great potential to replace carbon-based fuels in our vehicle fleets and stave off global warming. It's a difficult concept intellectually, so why not make this fun little science experiment to try it out for yourself? Yes, by following these simple instructions you can make a small hydrogen fuel cell at home that will even power some devices!

How To: Skip commercials with your Comcast DVR remote control

In this tutorial, we learn how to skip commercials with your Comcast DVR remote control. First, press the cable button, then press and hold the set up button until the cable button blinks twice. Now, enter in "994" on your remote. After this, the cable button will blink twice again. Now, press the setup button again and type in "00173", then press a button you don't use a lot. Now, the cable button will blink again. Now, turn on a show you have recorded and it will just through the commercial...

How To: Make a night vision device

Ever wish you could see in the dark? Well, you can't but this how-to will show you a way to build a device to help you out. You will need light polarizors, a flashlight, and a digital camera. Make an infrared night vision device, just follow along with the steps in this video tutorial. Now you can see at night!

How To: Make a laser out of a lighter

Kipkay has a new cool project for you. In this video, you'll learn how to make a laser out of a lighter. All you need to do is a cheap butane lighter. Any one will do, including one bought from a convenience store. Just watch this how-to video, and you'll be playing with your laser pointer in no time at all!

How To: Make a burning laser pointer that produces heat

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to make a burning laser pointer. Users will just need a regular 5Mw green laser pointer. Begin by unscrewing the top of the laser pointer and take out the batteries. Carefully with a pair of pliers, break the glue seal and remove the laser. Using a micro screwdriver, make sure that the screw on the laser is tight. Now using a soldering iron heat the 03 component shown in the video for a few seconds. Then assemble the laser back together. This video wi...

How To: Make your laser pointer run on AAA batteries

This video shows us the method to make your laser pointer work with AAA batteries. Take a metal casing made of metal. In the video, we take a Duracell mini flashlight and remove the front and back part. Unscrew the top and back of the laser pointer and remove the batteries. Roll some aluminium foil and put it in the metal casing. Put the AAA batteries in the casing with positive side inside. Put the casing and the laser pointer together and the laser works. Bind the two together by two rubber...

How To: Make an electromagnet with household items

Playing with magnets can be fun for people of all ages. Making your own magnets can also be a great way to keep yourself and young ones entertained as well. This tutorial will take you through the motion of making an electromagnet using items that are regaularly found within your home. Enjoy!

How To: Use a CRT oscilloscope

Wondering how to use an old-timey oscilloscope? Learn how with this video tutorial, which offers step-by-step instructions on setting up and adjusting an old cathode ray tube oscilloscope for the measurment of signals. For more information, or to get started using your own oscilloscope, take a look.

How To: Set up an X10 spy camera

The spy camera shown in this how-to video has a 60 foot cable, and is full color and has audio. This spy cam can be used as a security device, or to feed paranoid delusions or stalking urges. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to set up an X10 spy camera.

News: Japan's Flying, Tumbling Reconnaissance Sphere Soars at 37 MPH

Flying orbs. At first, you might think of the Tall Man and his army of flying sentinel spheres, equipped with zombie brains and a mini-arsenal of saw blades, drill bits and shooting lasers. But these flying orbs weren't conceived from the evil mind of a superhuman mortician—they were designed by Fumiyuki Sato, a researcher at the Japanese Defense Ministry's Technical Research and Development Institute—for something other than deadly deeds.

News: FakeTV Keeps Burglars Away by Mimicking Television Light and Scene Changes

In the last decade, burglary rates in the United States have fluctuated little with over 2 million burglaries each year. In 2009, nearly three quarters of all burglaries were from residential properties, with over sixty percent being forcible entry. But we all know burglars don't like confrontation—they prefer breaking into apartments and houses when its owners are away. And that's why it's a must for apartment dwellers and homeowners to be on the defensive, even when they're not home.

Coming Soon: Spy Video Glasses with Real Time Streaming to... Facebook?

Lady Gaga and Polaroid's upcoming Grey Label Camera Glasses can record video and snap pictures, but who really wants to show the world what they're up too on those mini LCD screens? It's nothing more than a fancy gimmick between a pop star and a failing company. Isn't the intention of camera glasses to capture things around you as they are? Drawing attention to yourself with clunky video-displaying eyewear kind of defeats the purpose, but that's why they're "fashion" glasses and not practical...

News: The World's First Teensy, Weensy 3D Printed Bikini

For the hefty price of $200 and up, you can be the proud owner of the world's first 3D printed bikini. And not just the first bikini, but reportedly the first functional and affordable item of ready-to-wear 3D printed clothing on the market. Created by Continuum Fashion, the N12 3D printed bikini is revolutionary because it addresses the technical challenge of creating flexible "textiles" with 3D printed material. The bikini is made of a material called Nylon 12, which is entirely waterproof.

News: New Biometric Device Steals Fingerprints from 6 Feet Away

Dactyloscopy isn’t going anywhere. Forensic science has much relied on fingerprinting as a means of identification, largely because of the massive amount of fingerprints stored in the FBI’s biometric database (IAFIS), which houses over 150,000 million prints. And thanks to the departure of messy ink-stained fingertips, biometric analysis isn’t just for solving crimes anymore.

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